Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58170

Disability-related Simulations: If, When, and How to Use Them in Professional Development

File Size Format  
1182.pdf 158.76 kB Adobe PDF View/Open
1181.docx 159.79 kB Microsoft Word XML View/Open
1183.txt 41.52 kB Text View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Disability-related Simulations: If, When, and How to Use Them in Professional Development
Authors:Burgstahler, Sheryl
Doe, Tanis
Keywords:postsecondary
simulations
training
disability awareness
Date Issued:2004
Publisher:University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies
Citation:Burgstahler, S. & Doe, T. (2004). Disability-related Simulations: If, When, and How to Use Them in Professional Development. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 2(2).
Series:vol. 1, no. 2
Abstract:Increasing numbers of students with disabilities participate in mainstream pre-college classes in preparation for higher education. Many educators and administrators have limited knowledge about specific accommodations that can facilitate learning for students with disabilities. Professional development has the potential to increase their knowledge and skills in this area. Simulations of disability experiences, such as completing tasks while covering eyes or sitting in a wheelchair, have sometimes been used to show learners what it is like to have a disability. This form of training has been criticized as inappropriate in the context of emerging paradigms of disability studies, which leads to the question: “Is the use of disability-related simulations ever appropriate?” In this article, we explore positive and negative aspects of disability-related simulations; paradigm shifts regarding approaches to disability studies; implications for training educators and administrators, and examples of disability awareness activities that maximize positive outcomes.
URI/DOI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58170
ISSN:1552-9215
Appears in Collections: RDS Volume 1, No. 2


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.