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The Effects of Soil Physical Parameters on the Diffusion of Phosphorus in Hawaiian Soils

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Title:The Effects of Soil Physical Parameters on the Diffusion of Phosphorus in Hawaiian Soils
Authors:Braide, Jonathan Oko
Date Issued:1971
Abstract:A soil belonging to the Haiku series collected from field H43 of Lihue Sugar Company on the Island of Kauai, was used to study the effect of phosphorus concentration, moisture content, and bulk density on the diffusion of phosphorus. Similarly, a soil in the Honokaa series collected from phosphate test plots on the Island of Hawaii was used to show the relationship between the apparent diffusion coefficient and the phosphorus concentration in the soil solution.
The experimental approach involved the use of wax blocks for soil core preparation, and a radiotracer technique for diffusion measurement.
The results show that phosphorus diffusion in the Haiku soil is strongly dependent on phosphorus concentration, particularly after a critical concentration of 2 micro-moles of P applied per cm2 of cross-sectional area of soil, is reached. Moisture effect becomes apparent only at high water contents. The apparent diffusion coefficient, Dp, decreases as the bulk density is increased from 0.8 to 1.2 gm/cm3, but then increases as the bulk density is increased to 1.4 gm/cm3. The decrease in Dp is attributed to the overriding influence of chemical adsorption, while the increase is attributed to the greater continuity of water filled pores at high volumetric moisture content.
A significant regression was shown to exist between the phosphorus concentration in the soil solution and the apparent diffusion coefficient of phosphorus in Honokaa soil.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/56279
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Agronomy and Soil Science


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