Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51283

Do you Dare to Share? Self-Disclosure Practices and Effects Among Micro-Celebrities with Mental Illness and Their Followers

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Item Summary

Title: Do you Dare to Share? Self-Disclosure Practices and Effects Among Micro-Celebrities with Mental Illness and Their Followers
Authors: Galiher, Mari
Keywords: Mental Health
Social Media Networks
Micro-celebrities
Celebrities
Issue Date: May 2016
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2016]
Abstract: In the past few years, social media has shined a light on the elephant in the room for those who suffer with mental illness. Much of this development has been attributed to traditional celebrities who have worked to reduce the stigma associated with mental illness. With the rise of micro-celebrities, ordinary people who acquire a level of celebrity through social media, it is important to understand how self-disclosure by micro-celebrities, rather than traditional celebrities, encourage others to be more open about mental illness. Through content and discourse analyses of five Twitter and five YouTube micro-celebrities who self-disclose over social media, the study examined whether followers who watched and interacted with the microcelebrities and their content contributed to their own self-disclosure about mental illness. This study explores the intersection of psychology and social media, which may help the mental health community better understand the potential benefits of communication technologies.
Description: M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2016.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51283
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Communication


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