Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51141

Healing Generations of Historical Trauma in a Hawaiian Body of Knowledge. A Case Study of An Act to Prevent the Spread of Leprosy, 1865

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Item Summary

Title:Healing Generations of Historical Trauma in a Hawaiian Body of Knowledge. A Case Study of An Act to Prevent the Spread of Leprosy, 1865
Authors:Au, Meghan
Date Issued:Dec 2015
Publisher:[Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [December 2015]
Abstract:In an effort to curb the contraction of leprosy, An Act to Prevent the Spread of Leprosy was created in the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi. This thesis examines the ideology behind this law’s creation and the treatment prescribed by it, in order to critically explore its past effects and carefully investigate its present-day repercussions. A Kanaka Maoli health practitioner lens is used as a viewing tool to connect history, politics and health over time periods and across populations. This thesis includes literature reviews on policies of regulation, human experience, historical trauma, measurements for human and Indigenous rights and self-determined methods for rebuilding health. Conceptual modeling adds visual connections between disease, policy, people and health, and a survey of Hawaiian language newspapers provides a bridge to ancestral voices on these topics. Findings suggest colonial ideology racialized An Act to Prevent the Spread of Leprosy to regulate Kānaka Maoli through stigmatization, criminalization, separation/displacement and experimentation against our cultural responses to disease. Through historical trauma and with the political power to create or destroy health, colonial ideology within An Act to Prevent the Spread of Leprosy continues to regulate, control and adversely impact Kānaka Maoli health representations of people, ʻāina and nation today. These findings and the suggested healing interventions can be applied to all peoples affected by colonization and/or occupation, where it is necessary to intimately and carefully examine past events and historical trauma in order to move forward in current healing situations.
Description:M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2015.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51141
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Hawaiian Studies


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