Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51123

The Impact of Comorbid Depression on Anger, Quality of Life, and Posttraumatic Cognitions in Combat Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

File Description SizeFormat 
2015-08-phd-raab_r.pdfVersion for non-UH users. Copying/Printing is not permitted1.19 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
2015-08-phd-raab_uh.pdfFor UH users only1.42 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: The Impact of Comorbid Depression on Anger, Quality of Life, and Posttraumatic Cognitions in Combat Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Authors: Raab, Phillip
Issue Date: Aug 2015
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [August 2015]
Abstract: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychological disorder that can develop after exposure to traumatic experiences, and shares significant comorbidity with depression. This is of concern given the array of negative correlates associated with PTSD and depression comorbidity, and various explanations have been proposed to explain the large degree of overlap between disorders. These include the existence of a general traumatic stress construct, examination of symptom overlap between disorders, as well as models that attempt to explain the broader overlap between depression and anxiety, such as the Quadripartite Model. While there has been substantial research in the field of PTSD and depression comorbidity, there are still many areas in need of further empirical examination, including comorbid PTSD and depression’s impact on anger, quality of life, association with posttraumatic cognitions, as well as its relationship with PTSD numbing symptoms. The purpose of this dissertation was to address these gaps in the literature across three related studies. The first study examined the impact of comorbid MDD and PTSD numbing symptoms on state and trait anger, while the second study examined the associations of comorbid MDD, depressive symptoms, and PTSD symptom clusters with objective and subjective quality of life indices. The third study examined the differential associations of comorbid depressive symptoms and PTSD symptom clusters with posttraumatic cognitions. Taken together, the results of these three studies address the relationship between comorbid depression and PTSD numbing symptoms, inform the clinical care of comorbid individuals, and contribute to the ongoing development of explanations for this comorbidity.
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2015.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51123
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology


Please contact sspace@hawaii.edu if you need this content in an ADA compliant alternative format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.