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Immigration-Related Stressors, Religious Involvement, and Mental Health Problems among Aisan Americans and Hispanics

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Item Summary

Title: Immigration-Related Stressors, Religious Involvement, and Mental Health Problems among Aisan Americans and Hispanics
Authors: Liu, Sizhe
Keywords: Religious Involvement
Depressive Disorders
Suicidal Behaviors
Immigration-Related Stressors
Stress-Buffering
Issue Date: May 2015
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2015]
Abstract: Using the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study, this work examines how religious involvement and immigration-related stressors, such as age at immigration and English proficiency, independently and interactively affect depressive disorders and suicidal behaviors. The findings show U.S. born Asian Americans and Asian American immigrants who immigrated to the U.S. during childhood are at higher risk of lifetime depressive disorders and suicidal behaviors than those who arrived in the U.S. after childhood. Same patterns were found for the association between age at immigration and suicidal behaviors for Hispanics. Limited English proficiency increases the risk of having depressive disorders and planning for suicide for Asian Americans but shows no effect on both depressive disorders and suicidal behaviors for Hispanics. Most importantly, religious involvements buffer the detrimental effect of English barrier and immigration during childhood on suicidal plan for Asian Americans and Hispanics, respectively.
Description: M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2015.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/50902
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Sociology


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