Architecture + Ninjutsu: Negotiation of Tactical Space in Everyday Places

Date
2010-05
Authors
Kaneshiro, Kylan
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The main purpose of this research project is to see whether if two unrelated fields of study, architecture and ninjutsu (the art of the ninja, infamous for being Japan‘s espionage agents), can meet on common ground. Research Goals: Define Japanese anthropological space, tracing the creation of kukan or three-dimensional objective space (to broaden and deepen an understanding of space). Find different means to document movements stemming from ninjutsu, especially in terms of the relationship of body, space and movement. To capture spatial relationships in ninjutsu and find equivalencies in everyday places The methodology of this project will mostly be of the qualitative and experimental type. The training of ninjutsu is a purely a kinesthetic practice, where the one‘s own experience and interpretation are more important. I will also include case studies when necessary, or use phenomenological examples to help find reasoning for my findings. I will also conduct experiments using various mediums to help illustrate my points. I will also keep a journal as a record of my findings in the experiments or my personal opinions. The main methodology used to link the two worlds became the use of the helmet cam. This showed first person perspectives of the spaces experienced in ninjutsu, and I compared them with the spaces found in the everyday (between bodies). The second part was analytical diagrams that show the objective spacing between bodies to also help make a comparison. From this research, I have concluded that Ninjutsu and the everyday places we as architects create are both involve the action of spatial negotiation. By juxtaposing the two, ninjutsu and the everyday, the former is an intensification of the latter. They involve similar concepts, yet manifest in different ways.The main purpose of this research project is to see whether if two unrelated fields of study, architecture and ninjutsu (the art of the ninja, infamous for being Japan‘s espionage agents), can meet on common ground. Research Goals: Define Japanese anthropological space, tracing the creation of kukan or three-dimensional objective space (to broaden and deepen an understanding of space). Find different means to document movements stemming from ninjutsu, especially in terms of the relationship of body, space and movement. To capture spatial relationships in ninjutsu and find equivalencies in everyday places The methodology of this project will mostly be of the qualitative and experimental type. The training of ninjutsu is a purely a kinesthetic practice, where the one‘s own experience and interpretation are more important. I will also include case studies when necessary, or use phenomenological examples to help find reasoning for my findings. I will also conduct experiments using various mediums to help illustrate my points. I will also keep a journal as a record of my findings in the experiments or my personal opinions. The main methodology used to link the two worlds became the use of the helmet cam. This showed first person perspectives of the spaces experienced in ninjutsu, and I compared them with the spaces found in the everyday (between bodies). The second part was analytical diagrams that show the objective spacing between bodies to also help make a comparison. From this research, I have concluded that Ninjutsu and the everyday places we as architects create are both involve the action of spatial negotiation. By juxtaposing the two, ninjutsu and the everyday, the former is an intensification of the latter. They involve similar concepts, yet manifest in different ways.The main purpose of this research project is to see whether if two unrelated fields of study, architecture and ninjutsu (the art of the ninja, infamous for being Japan‘s espionage agents), can meet on common ground. Research Goals: Define Japanese anthropological space, tracing the creation of kukan or three-dimensional objective space (to broaden and deepen an understanding of space). Find different means to document movements stemming from ninjutsu, especially in terms of the relationship of body, space and movement. To capture spatial relationships in ninjutsu and find equivalencies in everyday places The methodology of this project will mostly be of the qualitative and experimental type. The training of ninjutsu is a purely a kinesthetic practice, where the one‘s own experience and interpretation are more important. I will also include case studies when necessary, or use phenomenological examples to help find reasoning for my findings. I will also conduct experiments using various mediums to help illustrate my points. I will also keep a journal as a record of my findings in the experiments or my personal opinions. The main methodology used to link the two worlds became the use of the helmet cam. This showed first person perspectives of the spaces experienced in ninjutsu, and I compared them with the spaces found in the everyday (between bodies). The second part was analytical diagrams that show the objective spacing between bodies to also help make a comparison. From this research, I have concluded that Ninjutsu and the everyday places we as architects create are both involve the action of spatial negotiation. By juxtaposing the two, ninjutsu and the everyday, the former is an intensification of the latter. They involve similar concepts, yet manifest in different ways.The main purpose of this research project is to see whether if two unrelated fields of study, architecture and ninjutsu (the art of the ninja, infamous for being Japan‘s espionage agents), can meet on common ground. Research Goals: Define Japanese anthropological space, tracing the creation of kukan or three-dimensional objective space (to broaden and deepen an understanding of space). Find different means to document movements stemming from ninjutsu, especially in terms of the relationship of body, space and movement. To capture spatial relationships in ninjutsu and find equivalencies in everyday places The methodology of this project will mostly be of the qualitative and experimental type. The training of ninjutsu is a purely a kinesthetic practice, where the one‘s own experience and interpretation are more important. I will also include case studies when necessary, or use phenomenological examples to help find reasoning for my findings. I will also conduct experiments using various mediums to help illustrate my points. I will also keep a journal as a record of my findings in the experiments or my personal opinions. The main methodology used to link the two worlds became the use of the helmet cam. This showed first person perspectives of the spaces experienced in ninjutsu, and I compared them with the spaces found in the everyday (between bodies). The second part was analytical diagrams that show the objective spacing between bodies to also help make a comparison. From this research, I have concluded that Ninjutsu and the everyday places we as architects create are both involve the action of spatial negotiation. By juxtaposing the two, ninjutsu and the everyday, the former is an intensification of the latter. They involve similar concepts, yet manifest in different ways.
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