Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45729

Branding in Architecture: Image and Spatial Communication

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Title:Branding in Architecture: Image and Spatial Communication
Authors:Okaneku, Reid
Contributors:Palagi, Kris (advisor)
Architecture (department)
Date Issued:May 2011
Abstract:This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role
and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand
is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific
branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger
branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public.
This research explores how a brand is expressed through product,
customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D
creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To
clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients,
this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a
“storyboard diagram.”
Pages/Duration:167 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45729
Appears in Collections: D.ARCH. - Architecture
2011


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