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Using apps for pronunciation training: An empirical evaluation of the English File Pronunciation app

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Title:Using apps for pronunciation training: An empirical evaluation of the English File Pronunciation app
Authors:Fouz-González, Jonás
Keywords:Pronunciation
Second Language Acquisition (SLA)
Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training (CAPT)
Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL)
Date Issued:01 Feb 2020
Publisher:University of Hawaii National Foreign Language Resource Center
Center for Language & Technology
(co-sponsored by Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning, University of Texas at Austin)
Citation:Fouz-González, J. (2020). Using apps for pronunciation training: An empirical evaluation of the English File Pronunciation app. Language Learning & Technology, 24(1), 62–85. https://doi.org/10125/44709
Abstract:This study explores the potential of the English File Pronunciation (EFP) app to help foreign language learners improve their pronunciation. Participants were 52 Spanish EFL learners enrolled in an English Studies degree. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess the participants’ perception and production (imitative, controlled, and spontaneous) before and after training. The targets addressed were a range of segmental features that tend to be fossilised in the interlanguage of advanced Spanish EFL learners, namely English /æ ɑː ʌ ə/ and the /s – z/ contrast. Training took place over a period of two weeks in which participants used the English File pronunciation app for around 20 minutes a day. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups (control and experimental). However, after the post-test, the group that had acted as control started to receive instruction and, after two weeks, took a second post-test, therefore acting as experimental too. Training fostered substantial improvements in the learners’ perception and production of the target features, although the differences between groups were not statistically significant for every sound or in every task.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/44709
ISSN:1094-3501
DOI:10125/44709
Volume:24
Issue/Number:1
Appears in Collections: Volume 24 Number 1, February 2020


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