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Are More Frequent Releases Always Better? Dynamics of Pivoting, Scaling, and the Minimum Viable Product

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Title:Are More Frequent Releases Always Better? Dynamics of Pivoting, Scaling, and the Minimum Viable Product
Authors:Anderson, Edward
Lim, Shi Ying
Joglekar, Nitin
Keywords:Agile
Minimum Viable Product
New Product Development
Pivot
System Dynamics
Date Issued:04 Jan 2017
Abstract:Using the system dynamics methodology, we model the minimum viable product (MVP) approach to product development and examine the impact of release frequency, planning practices and committed reengineering capacity on software development outcomes. We leverage the organizational learning, Lean Startup, and Agile methodology literature to form the underpinnings of the model and measure outcomes using cumulative market cost of failing to meet market wants and cumulative engineering cost. While shorter release cycles are better in general for achieving market fit, the relationship is moderated by planning delays and committed reengineering capacity. We show that reducing the extent of pivot in each iteration may be better for firms. Firms instead should iterate moderately and not radically during any particular release. Counter intuitively, planning delays are beneficial by reducing overreaction to spurious market signals. Finally, we discuss implications of our findings for future research on learning and planning amongst entrepreneurial firms.
Pages/Duration:10 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/41869
ISBN:978-0-9981331-0-2
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2017.705
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: Agile and Lean Discovery and Development Minitrack


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