Instructor: Noʻukahauʻoli Revilla

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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in English, clip 12 of 12
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Revilla, Noʻukahauʻoli ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: Muliwai is the meeting place where freshwater and saltwater... meet and interact. I take it in terms of composition, in terms of Mary Louise Pratt's idea of 'contact zones,' but I think muliwai is a more specific take on contact zones in Hawaiʻi... It's this in between space that does have its own livelihood. It's not this empty space. It's a productive space. It has its own relationships.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in English, clip 11 of 12
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Revilla, Noʻukahauʻoli ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: Malama ʻāina can be literally translated as to take care of the land... It's not just a throw away phrase of hospitality or... something to put on a bumper sticker. Malama ʻāina really asks you who you are in relationship to this land because you cannot care for this land properly or respectfully if you don't acknowledge who you are to this land and how you can take care of it.; [ʻĀina cannot simply be translated to 'land'] because Kānaka Maoli have a genealogical relationship to the land. We come from the land. The land is our kin, so when you think of it as just land, or landscapes... the spiritual connection [is lost]... [We have a] deep commitment to really taking care of the land as we would [our elders].
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in English, clip 10 of 12
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Revilla, Noʻukahauʻoli ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: A basic interpretation [of kuleana] can be responsibility.... Kuleana doesn't change, but to be aware of your relation to the place, the situation, [and] the people around you... It's a vigilance that needs to happen everyday... which is why place-based work needs to happen on a regular basis because relationships change because place changes. We change. When you pay... more nuance to place, you become a better person for it.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in English, clip 9 of 12
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Revilla, Noʻukahauʻoli ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: One of my roles as an instructor is to really emphasize relationships... It's this... relationship between you, your story, and your audience and the aftermath of that, your community of readers. It is my responsibility to take my ʻāina wherever I go and to do it well and respectfully. I really can't imagine not bringing this ʻāina into my work. I look forward to teaching an aloha ʻāina literature course in the future, [also a] gender and resistance [course], which will certainly look at land in the Pacific. Place-based work outside of Hawaiʻi is important because place is part of any relationship you're in. How you move within a place and how a place moves within you is very important.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in English, clip 8 of 12
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Revilla, Noʻukahauʻoli ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: I have not yet taught a course other than this one and English 100 [Foundations in Written Communication].