Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29643

Improbable Realities, Improbable Art: The American Tall Tale and the Instability of Humor in Children's Literature

Item Summary

dc.contributor.author Matthews, Karleanne
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-17T00:17:52Z
dc.date.available 2013-07-17T00:17:52Z
dc.date.issued 2012-05-11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29643
dc.description.abstract There are perhaps no two forms as undervalued as fantasy and humor, and yet there are no two forms more important. "Perhaps it has something to do with the Puritan, no-nonsense work ethic that has imbued the American fulture and made fantasy suspect," comments David L. Russel in his introduction to Literature for Children. But in his essay "Realism Plus Fantasy Equals Magic," Roger W. Drury defends not only the cear-cut fantasy of the fairy tale or epic quest, but the fantasy of everyday life, addressing the social anxiety that fantasy is somehow detrimental to chidlren.
dc.format.extent 64 pages
dc.publisher University of Hawaii at Manoa
dc.rights All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
dc.title Improbable Realities, Improbable Art: The American Tall Tale and the Instability of Humor in Children's Literature
dc.type Term Project
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.contributor.instructor Caron, James
Appears in Collections: Honors Projects for English


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