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Tam Hang Rockshelter: Preliminary Study of a Prehistoric Site in Northern Laos

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dc.contributor.authorDemeter, Fabriceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSayavongkhamdy, Thongsaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatole-Edoumba, Eliseen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoupey, Anne-Sophieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBacon, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Vos, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorTougard, Christelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBouasisengpaseuth, Bounheuangen_US
dc.contributor.authorSichanthongtip, Phonephanhen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuringer, Philippeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-23T18:12:04Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-23T18:12:04Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn0066-8435 (Print)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1535-8283 (E-ISSN)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10125/29086-
dc.description.abstractIn February 1934, Jacques Fromaget, from the Geological Service of Indochina, discovered the Tam Hang site in northern Laos. The site is a rockshelter, located on the southeastern slope of the Annamitic Chain on the edge of the P’a Hang cliff. The geologist’s excavation revealed considerable faunal remains from the middle Pleistocene as well as human biological and cultural remains from the pre-Holocene period. One of the human skeletons discovered by Fromaget buried beneath the shelter has recently been radiocarbon-dated to 15,740G80 b.p. After being relocated by Thongsa Sayavongkhamdy, an international team carried out new excavations in April 2003. Undisturbed cultural layers from the late Pleistocene and the early Holocene have been identified. The presence of pottery and a lithic industry suggests the use of the site from at least the late Pleistocene into the Holocene. This particularity confers on the site a character rarely found in mainland Southeast Asia. This preliminary study describes the 2003 excavation, the cultural elements found, and presents the historical and archaeological significance of the site in the international context of the quest for human origins that prevailed in the 1930s.en_US
dc.format.extent18 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 48en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNumber 2en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United Statesen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/en_US
dc.subjectLaosen_US
dc.subjectTam Hangen_US
dc.subjectrockshelteren_US
dc.subjectPleistoceneen_US
dc.subjectearly Holoceneen_US
dc.subjectlithic industryen_US
dc.subjectpotteryen_US
dc.subject.lcshPrehistoric peoples--Asia--Periodicals.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPrehistoric peoples--Oceania--Periodicals.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAsia--Antiquities--Periodicals.en_US
dc.subject.lcshOceania--Antiquities--Periodicals.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEast Asia--Antiquities--Periodicals.en_US
dc.titleTam Hang Rockshelter: Preliminary Study of a Prehistoric Site in Northern Laosen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.type.dcmiTexten_US
Appears in Collections:Asian Perspectives, 2009 - Volume 48, Number 2 (Fall)


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