The Potential Environmental and Public Health Effects of Chemical Regeneration of Spent Granular Activated Carbon

Date
1999-01
Authors
Fukuda, Tracy K.
Babcock, Roger W.
Menon, Premlata
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract
Chemical regeneration is one method of regenerating spent granular activated carbon. The chemicals being considered for use are acetic acid, acetone, formic acid, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide methanol, ethanol, and 2-Propanol. The potential environmental and public health effects of chemical regeneration of spent granular activated carbon causes concern. Information on the eight chemicals and environmental regulations were gathered by doing a literature survey. An evaluation of these chemicals- occupational standards; acute and chronic effects; carcinogenic, reproductive, and mutagenic effects; and environmental fate- showed no anticipated hazards. With the proper preventative and mitigative measures, any unnecessary exposure and adverse effects can be prevented. Chemical regeneration is an alternative to handling spent GAC.
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Citation
Fukuda T, Babcock RW, Menon P. 1999. The potential environmental and public health effects of chemical regeneration of spent granular activated carbon. Honolulu (HI): Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa. WRRC-99-04.
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