Browsing Plant Disease, 1997 - present by Title

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Now showing items 36-55 of 65

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  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2009-02)
    Numerous problems can beset landscape plantings. Mismatching of plants and growing conditions, lack of attention to irrigation, installation of poorly grown and planted materials, and other avoidable situations are described.
  • Nelson, Scot C (University of Hawaii, 2008-08)
    This fungal pathogen causes devastation of many crops worldwide. In Hawaii it can be severe in locations that experience cool, rainy, and humid conditions; locations or seasons where these prevail should be avoided for ...
  • Nelson, Scot C (University of Hawaii, 2008-07)
    This publication explains how lightning strikes and damages plants and shows injury on coconut, papaya, and banana.
  • Nelson, Scot; Brewbaker, James; Hu, John (University of Hawaii, 2011-12)
    This publication describe maize chlorotic mottle, the pathogen, vectors and virus transmission, and the disease epidemiology and symptoms. It suggests integrated practices for successful management of maize cholorotic ...
  • Ferreira, Stephen A (University of Hawaii, 1998-10)
    This is a brief, general guide to the subject.
  • Nelson, Scot; Schmitt, Donald; Smith, Virginia Easton (University of Hawaii, 2002-10)
    This publication combines handout materials developed for workshops for coffee growers.
  • Nelson, Scot C (University of Hawaii, 2008-08)
    Wet weather during flowering favors this disease and can severely limit fruit bearing. Symptoms are illustrated and control options, including fungicides, are discussed.
  • Nelson, Scot C (University of Hawaii, 2008-08)
    Unlike anthracnose, which affects mango in wet areas, the powdery mildew fungus occurs primarily in dry areas and must be controlled during flowering to obtain acceptable fruit yields.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2005-07)
    Identification, prevention, and control of this nematode pest on noni, an important Hawaiian medicinal plant, are discussed.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2008-10)
    This is perhaps the most important of the various fungal diseases affecting papaya in Hawaii. Symptoms are illustrated and control options discussed; fungicides are listed.
  • Schmitt, Donald P; Sipes, Brent S (University of Hawaii, 1998-12)
    This is a general guide to nematode pests, including those present in Hawaii. Methods of sampling for nematode assay are described.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2009-01)
    Plumeria is important to Hawaii's ornamental landscape and lei flower industries. This disease was first noted affecting plumeria leaves and causing defoliation in 1991. Control options are discussed.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2008-10)
    Various fungal diseases affect banana plants, but the most economically important ones limit marketability of the fruits. Practices to reduce disease incidence are described.
  • Nelson, Scot; Patnude, Erik (University of Hawaii, 2012-07)
    This publication illustrates the importance of potassium in palms. It provides photos of symptom and discusses causes, prevention and treatment of potassium deficiency.
  • Wang, Koon-Hui; Hooks, Cerruti R2; Ploeg, Antoon (University of Hawaii, 2007-07)
    Tagetes spp. suppression of nematodes and uses in cropping systems are described as alternatives to synthetic nematicides, which are expensive, increasingly unavailable, and have negative effects on other soil organisms.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2005-07)
    Good field sanitation, pruning to encourage ventilation, and use of copper fungicides or other registered products are advised to control this rot.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2009-02)
    Symptoms on Okinawan sweetpotato are shown, and integrated practices designed to minimize losses to farmers and marketers are recommended.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2005-09)
    This non-native rust fungus affects several native Hawaiian species of Abutilon.
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2008-11)
    West Indian lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) is primarily grown as an ornamental and garden herb in Hawaii. This disease was first reported here in 1985; chemical control is limited to one registered product, the efficacy ...
  • Nelson, Scot (University of Hawaii, 2009-01)
    This rust of the native Hawaiian forest tree Acacia koa causes a witches' broom symptom on branch terminals. Symptoms caused by the various spore types of the fungus are listed.
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