Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/841

Effect of irradiation on the longevity and reproduction of Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) queens

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Title: Effect of irradiation on the longevity and reproduction of Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) queens
Authors: Follett, Peter A.
Taniguchi, Glenn
Keywords: ant control
dosage
egg hatchability
exports
Hawaii
show 9 moreinsect pests
irradiation
longevity
ova
Pheidole megacephala
postharvest treatment
quarantine
quarantine pests
queens

show less
Issue Date: Dec 2007
Publisher: Hawaiian Entomological Society
Citation: Follett PA, Taniguchi G. 2007. Effect of irradiation on the longevity and reproduction of Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) queens. Proc Hawaiian Entomol Soc 39:43-48.
Abstract: Irradiation is a quarantine treatment option to control ants and other hitchhiker
pests on fresh horticultural products exported from Hawaii. The radiotolerance of the bigheaded ant, Pheidole megacephala (F.), was studied to determine a dose sufficient
for its control. This ant was chosen as a representative species because it is a common
hitchhiker and rearing methods in the laboratory have been developed. The desired
response with irradiation treatment of ants is sterility of reproductive females. Queens
from micro-colonies were irradiated at 60, 90, 120, or 150 Gy or left untreated as controls, then followed for 19 weeks to observe colony growth. In general, queen longevity, and the number of eggs, larvae, and pupae observed in the micro-colonies decreased with increasing irradiation dose. In the 60 Gy treatment, the number of eggs observed was reduced by 89.6% compared with the untreated controls. In the 120 Gy and 150 Gy treatments, the number of eggs observed was reduced by 99.5% and 98.5%, respectively,
and no eggs were found after the first observation date at 7 days after treatment. No larvae or pupae were observed in the 90, 120, or 150 Gy treatments, suggesting these
irradiation doses sterilized queens. This study suggests the USDA-APHIS-approved
generic irradiation dose of 400 Gy is sufficient for the Formicidae. Information is needed on the radiotolerance of additional species of ants to confirm our findings.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/841
ISSN: 0073-134X
Appears in Collections:Volume 39 - December 2007 : Hawaiian Entomological Society



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