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Title: History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: ´Apapane, ´Akohekohe, & ´Uha´aihawane 
Author: Banko, Winston E.
Date: 1987-07
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Banko WE. 1987. History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: ´Apapane, ´Akohekohe, & ´Uha´aihawane. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. CPSU/UH Avian History Report, 11a.
Abstract: Himatione sanguinea is a small, deep crimson forest bird with white abdomen and tail coverts, and black tail and wings. It ranges from low to high elevation on all six forested islands. Exhaustive search of literature and field journals uncovered some 1,279 observational notes, collection records, reports, and related statements on relative abundance and geographical distribution from 1778 to 1978. All records are serially numbered, arranged in geographical and chronological order, referenced as to source, and
systematically analyzed. It is concluded that, compared with the 1890’s, H. sanquinea has depopulated significantly over wide areas in lowland forests on Kaua´i, O´ahu, Maui, and in mid to upper-elevation habitats on Moloka´i and Lana´i. On Hawai´i this species has largely disappeared from the lowlands and from mid and upper-elevation habitats in Hamakua and Kona. Only in the Külani area is H. sanquinea still evident in very large numbers (tens of thousands). Despite these declines, H. sanquinea remains the commonest Hawaiian honeycreeper in native forest throughout the Islands, and is the most likely forest bird for even the casual visitor to observe above ca. 3000 feet in suitable habitat.

Palmeria dolei, or ‘Akohekohe, is a medium-sized, dark grey forest bird with whitish crest and scarlet-tipped feathers on the head and neck. It formerly ranged from low to high elevations on Moloka’i and East Maui. Exhaustive search of literature and field journals uncovered some 87 observational notes, collection records, reports and related statements on relative abundance and geographical distribution from 1888 to 1979. All records are serially numbered, arranged in geographical and chronological order, referenced as to source and systematically analyzed. It is conclude that, compared with the 1890’s, ‘Akohekohe have become completely depopulated on the island of Moloka’i and in low to middle elevation forests up to about 5000 ft. elevation on East Maui. Its relative abundance in upper forests of East Maui presently ranges form rare at about 5000 to 5800 ft. to locally common or abundant from about 5800 to 6700 ft. elevation.

Ciridops anna, or Ula’ai’hawane, is a small grey and red forest bird with black forehead, wings and tail. Endemic to the island of Hawai’i it ranged in Kohala, Mauna Kea, and possibly Kona and Kilauea Districts. Exhaustive search of literature and field journals uncovered only 20 reports (mostly negative), collection records, and related statements on its relative abundance and geographical distribution. There is no evidence in the historical record that ornithologists ever glimpsed Ula’ai’hawane in the wild. Only one of five spec imens extant is preserved with date and locality of collection. No substantiated record of this species exists after native Hawaiians reported seeing it above ‘O’okala about 1892. It is presumed extinct.
Series/Report No.: Avian History Report
11a
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsorship: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; National Park Service Contract No. CX 8000 2 0012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/814
Keywords: Akohekohe, Apapane, Ciridops anna, Crested honeycreeper, Himatione sanguinea, Palmeria dolei, Ula ai hawane
LC Subject Headings: Bird populations -- Hawaii.
Endangered species -- Hawaii.
Endemic birds -- Hawaii -- History.
Extinct birds -- Hawaii.
Forest birds -- Hawaii.
Rare birds -- Hawaii.

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This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • The Avian History Reports [20]
    This collection presents the Avian History Reports (AHR), A Historical Synthesis of Recent Endemic Hawaiian Birds (1979-1990).

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