Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/8127

Files

File Description SizeFormat 
5Shelly.pdf23.16 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Feeding on Papaya Flowers Enhances Mating Competitiveness of Male Oriental Fruit Flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)
Authors: Shelly, Todd E.
Keywords: Bactrocera dorsalis
Carica papaya
feeding behavior
flowers
fruit flies
males
mating competitiveness
mating frequency
methyl eugenol
papayas
Issue Date: May-2001
Publisher: Hawaiian Entomological Society
Citation: Shelly TE. 2001. Feeding on papaya flowers enhances mating competitiveness of male oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae). Proc Hawaiian Entomol Soc 35:41–47.
Abstract: Males of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), are attracted to and feed on methyl eugenol. The goal of the present study was to determine whether feeding on a methyl eugenol-bearing plant, papaya (Carica papaya L.) would result in a mating advantage for B. dorsalis males. Mating frequencies of males given access to flowers (treated) and flower-deprived males (control) were compared in trials conducted 2 and 7 d after treated males were exposed to the flowers. For both intervals, treated males accounted for a significantly larger number of matings than control males. A second experiment compared female attraction to control and treated males. When at a lek, males display vigorous wing-fanning behavior, presumably to increase dispersal of the sex pheromone. Floral feeding resulted in a significant increase in wing-
fanning activity but did not appear to affect the attractiveness of the pheromonal signal per se. A field experiment revealed that male captures in methyl eugenol-baited traps were not reduced by prior feeding on papaya flowers.
Pages/Duration: 7 pages
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/8127
ISSN: 0073-134X
Appears in Collections:Volume 35 - May 2001 : Hawaiian Entomological Society



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons