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Phylogenetic Analysis of Subterranean Termites (Coptotermes spp., Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Indicates the Origins of Hawaiian and North American Invasions: Potential Implications for Invasion Biology

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Title: Phylogenetic Analysis of Subterranean Termites (Coptotermes spp., Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Indicates the Origins of Hawaiian and North American Invasions: Potential Implications for Invasion Biology
Authors: Gentz, Margaret C.
Rubinoff, Daniel
Grace, J Kenneth
Keywords: Coptotermes formosanus
geographical variation
Hawaii
invasive species
North America
show 3 morenucleotide sequences
phylogeny
sequence analysis

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Issue Date: Dec 2008
Publisher: Hawaiian Entomological Society
Citation: Gentz MC, Rubinoff D, Grace JK. 2008. Phylogenetic analysis of subterranean termites (Coptotermes spp., Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) indicates the origins of Hawaiian and North American invasions: potential implications for invasion biology. Proc Hawaiian Entomol Soc 40:1–9.
Abstract: Subterranean termites in the genus Coptotermes Holmgren are structural
pests that have become globally distributed beyond their native range in Southeast Asia.
Because of their destructive nature, it is useful to understand the pathways of their
spread. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of evolutionary relationships may lead to
increased accuracy of insecticide-based management on the basis that related species
are likely to share similar physiology. Cytochrome oxidase II nucleotide sequences
were used to construct phylogenies of subterranean termites using both maximum
parsimony and maximum likelihood models. The data set included subterranean
termites (Rhinotermitidae), including C. formosanus Shiraki, and used drywood
termites (Kalotermitidae) as putative outgroups. Both methods supported the main
results, that Hawaiian infestations likely originated in Asia and that some infestations in North America either came through Hawaii or originated independently from the same ancestral region as the Hawaiian infestations. Coptotermes formosanus, the most significant pest, appears to be paraphyletic with respect to several other species in the genus, and may represent two cryptic species. Other infestations in North America appear to have originated separately in Asia. A phylogeographic hypothesis non-molecular information was also supported by these data.
Pages/Duration: 8 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7814
ISSN: 0073-134X
Appears in Collections:Volume 40 - December 2008 : Hawaiian Entomological Society



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