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History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: freshwater birds: Hawaiian Stilt Ae´o

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Title: History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: freshwater birds: Hawaiian Stilt Ae´o
Authors: Banko, Winston E.
Keywords: Himantopus mexicanus
Aeo
LC Subject Headings: Endemic birds -- Hawaii -- History.
Bird populations -- Hawaii.
Water birds -- Hawaii.
Stilts (Birds) -- Hawaii.
Black-necked stilt.
Issue Date: May 1988
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Banko WE. 1988. History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: freshwater birds: Hawaiian Stilt Ae´o. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. CPSU/UH Avian History Report, 12d.
Series/Report no.: Avian History Report
12d
Abstract: Himantopus mexicanus knudseni is a slim, medium-sized black and white wading bird with long black bill and red legs. It is resident on five islands - Kaua´i, O´ahu, Moloka'i, Maui, Hawai´i, and on Ni´ihau after seasonal winter rains. Exhaustive search of literature and government reports uncovered some 5,429 observational notes, collection records,
census reports and related statements on relative abundance and geographical distribution from 1870 to 1983. Data are serially numbered, arranged in geographical and chronological order, referenced and systematically reviewed. Analysis of census records in recent years indicates a total pre-breeding population of about 900 of these birds distributed as follows among the various islands: Kaua'i, 144 (16%); Ni´ihau, 135 (15%); O´ahu 324 (36%) ; Moloka´i 9 (1%); Maui, 261 (29%); and Hawai´i 18 (2%) recent post-breeding populations averaging 1,100 individuals were found to be distributed as follows: Kaua'i 286 (26%); Ni'ihau, 44 (4%); O'ahu 495 (45%); Moloka'i, 22 (2%); Maui, 242 (22%); and Hawai´i 22 (2%). It is postulated that mortality factors and annual average production of about 200 young results in a population turnover every 5 years. The total population is judged to be relatively stable long-term.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; National Park Service Contract No. CX 8000 8 0012
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/773
Appears in Collections:The Avian History Reports



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