Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7356

Files

File Description SizeFormat 
116.pdf1.24 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Habitat use by fish ('o'opu), snails (hihiwai), shrimp ('opae) and prawns in two streams on the island of Moloka'i
Authors: Brasher, Anne M.
LC Subject Headings: Freshwater fishes -- Habitat -- Hawaii -- Molokai.
Shrimps -- Habitat -- Hawaii -- Molokai.
Snails -- Habitat -- Hawaii -- Molokai.
Stream ecology -- Hawaii -- Molokai.
Issue Date: Dec-1997
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Brasher AM. 1997. Habitat use by fish ('o'opu), snails (hihiwai), shrimp ('opae) and prawns in two streams on the island of Moloka'i. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 116.
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
116
Abstract: Habitat use by gobies, molluscs and crustaceans was evaluated in two streams on the Island of Moloka'i, Hawai'i. One stream, Waikolu, is diverted while the other, Pelekunu, is not. The study focused on three native gobies (Awaous guamensis, Sicyopterus stimpsoni and Lentipes concolor), a native snail (Neritina granosa), a native shrimp (Atyoida bisulcata) and an introduced prawn (Macrobrachium lar). In both Waikolu and Pelekunu Streams, species showed less longitudinal separation than typically report Hawaiian stream systems. The range of habitat availability was wider in Pelekunu Stream than in Waikolu Stream, reflecting the fact that Waikolu Stream is diverted. Overall, habitat use tended to reflect availability, with animals utilizing the deeper and faster water available in Pelekunu Stream; consequently, species overlap was higher in Waikolu Stream. The impact of diversions on fauna in oceanic islands such as Hawai'i can be especially severe because dewatering will prevent downstream dispersal of larvae and upstream migration of post-larvae, critical to the lifecycle of amphidromous species.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: National Park Service Cooperative Agreement CA 8006 2 9004
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7356
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.