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The impact and spread of Rubus ellipticus in 'Ola'a Forest Tract Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

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Title: The impact and spread of Rubus ellipticus in 'Ola'a Forest Tract Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park
Authors: Stratton, Lisa
Keywords: Olaa Forest Tract
LC Subject Headings: Endemic plants -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)
Invasive plants -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Plant competition -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Rubus -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Issue Date: Dec 1996
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Stratton L. 1996. The impact and spread of Rubus ellipticus in 'Ola'a Forest Tract Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 107.
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
107
Abstract: Rubus ellipticus (Rosaceae), is a large thorny shrub that has demonstrated the capability of establishing itself in the canopy of tree-fern dominated rain forest areas as well as in open pastures, old sugar cane fields and drier areas of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Introduced to the Volcano Agricultural Experiment Station in 1961, it has since spread to adjacent areas on the island of Hawaii as well as to areas over 120 km from the Station. This study focused on quantifying the impact on the native vegetation as well as the rate of spread within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park's 'Ola'a Large Tract. Total cover of R. ellipticus per transect doubled over 5 years from a transect average of 6% to 13%. Impact on vegetation cover was assessed by comparing understory vegetation beneath R. ellipticus, tree ferns and random forest locations in a stratified block design. Total understory cover was significantly lower under R. ellipticus as was species diversity. A finding that the pig-free section of the unit showed almost no increase in R. ellipticus cover suggests that pigs contribute to the expansion of this weed in Hawai'i's native montane rain forests.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: National Park Service Cooperative Agreement 1445 CA09 94 1066
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7312
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



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