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Yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica): biology and abatement in the National Parks of Hawaii

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Title: Yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica): biology and abatement in the National Parks of Hawaii
Authors: Gambino, Parker
Loope, Lloyd L.
LC Subject Headings: Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)
National parks and reserves -- Hawaii.
Yellow jackets (Insects) -- Control -- Hawaii.
Issue Date: Feb 1992
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Gambino P, Loope LL. 1992. Yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica): biology and abatement in the National Parks of Hawaii. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 86.
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
86
Abstract: The western yellowjacket Vespula pensylvanica (Saussure) has become widely established in the Hawaiian Islands, where it exhibits a high degree of reproductive plasticity. Although most colonies in Hawaii Volcanoes and Haleakala National Park adhere to the basic annual cycle dominant throughout this wasp's native range in western North America, overwintered colonies were detected in some years. Polygyny, achieved by adding queens to an established colony, is a likely prerequisite for successful overwintering. The large size of overwintered colonies and some annual colonies (with more than 300 worker sorties per minute from the nest) results in very heavy predation on local arthropod biota. Workers of Vespula pensylvanica take a wide variety of prey at or near plant and soil surfaces. Populations of highly precinctive endemic arthropods may in some instances be unable to recover from such intense predation pressure. Although even local eradication of Y. pensylvanica is not feasible, toxic baiting trials using Knoxout 2FM in canned chicken bait, with enhancement of bait acceptance with heptyl butyrate, were in many instances effective in drastically reducing yellowjacket forager populations. Toxic baiting was most consistently effective in high elevation shrubland and least effective in forest situations. A protocol is presented for use by resource managers in dealing with yellowjacket threats to native biota and to visitors.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: National Park Service Cooperative Agreement CA 8018 2 0001
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7173
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



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