Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7006

Isokinetic bench press as a criterion measure of upper body power in NCAA Division I college football player starters and non-starters

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Item Summary

Title: Isokinetic bench press as a criterion measure of upper body power in NCAA Division I college football player starters and non-starters
Authors: Nakasuji, Joy K.
Advisor: Kimura, Iris
Issue Date: Aug 2003
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the isokinetic bench press could discriminate football-playing ability and to correlate the isokinetic bench press with other commonly used football upper and lower body power tests. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I collegiate football players aged 18-26 years were divided into two groups by player ability: starters (Group 2) and non-starters (Group 1). On separate days, subjects performed the vertical jump, 40-yard dash, one-repetition maximum (RM) bench press and isokinetic bench press at 60, 180 and 300°/s. Pearson Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant correlations among all measures in the present study (height, weight, isokinetic peak force at 60°/s, 180°/s and 300°/s, vertical jump, 1-RM bench press and 40-yard dash). Height and weight negatively correlated with all measures, except the 40-yard dash, indicating that taller and/or heavier football players produced higher (slower) 40-yard dash times. Three 1 x 2 ANOVA's (p<0.05) were used to compare 40-yard dash times, vertical jump, and 1-RM bench press between starters and non-starters, respectively. Results indicated that 40-yard dash times of starters were significantly faster than non-starters, and no significant differences in vertical jump values and 1-RM bench press torque between starters and non-starters. Four x 2 ANOVA with repeated measures (p<0.05) analysis indicated that starters and non-starters produced significantly higher 1-RM bench press torque values than isokinetic bench press peak torque values at 60, 180, and 300°/s; higher isokinetic bench press peak torque values at 60°s/ than at 180 and 300°/s; and no significant difference between isokinetic bench press peak torque values at 180 and 300°/s. Three x 2 ANOVA with repeated measures (p<0.05) analysis indicated that football starters produced significantly higher isokinetic bench press peak torque values at 60°/s than nonstarters. Conclusion: isokinetic bench press can be used as an upper body power test to discriminate between starters and non-starters.
Description: viii, 48 leaves
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7006
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:M.S. - Kinesiology and Leisure Science



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