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Studies in montane bogs of Haleakala National Park: aspects of the history and biology of the montane bogs

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Title: Studies in montane bogs of Haleakala National Park: aspects of the history and biology of the montane bogs
Authors: Loope, Lloyd L.
Medeiros, Arthur C.
Gagne, Betsy H.
LC Subject Headings: Bog plants -- Hawaii -- Maui.
Bogs -- Hawaii -- Maui.
Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)
Issue Date: Aug 1991
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Loope LL, Medeiros AC, Gagne BH. 1991. Studies in montane bogs of Haleakala National Park: aspects of the history and biology of the montane bogs. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 76.
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
76
Abstract: Montane bogs occur on northeastern Haleakala volcano at 1450-2270 m elevation, with a distinctive, largely endemic flora dominated by the sedges Carex alligata, Carex echinata, Cara montis-eeka, Oreobolus furcatus, and Rhynchospora rugosa subsp. lavarum, the grass Deschampsia nubigena, and the moss Racomitrium lanuginosum. Although these treeless areas, surrounded by cloud forest, occupy less than 20 ha within Haleakala National Park, 15 endemic plant species are largely confined to bog habitats. A mostly water-impervious substrate layer and an annual rainfall of ca. 10,000 mm create nearly permanently flooded conditions. Invasion of forest species into these bogs may be limited primarily by waterlogged and nutrient-poor soils, but moisture stress caused by prolonged periods of high solar irradiation or infrequent short-term freezing conditions may be contributing factors. Disturbance by feral pigs, beginning in the 1970s, has resulted in destruction of native plant cover and invasion of alien species. Exclusion of feral pigs by fencing selected areas has proved to be an effective strategy for protecting native bog vegetation.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: National Park Service
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/5889
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



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