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The Association of Peripheral Blood Monocytes to Cardiometabolic Complications in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

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Item Summary

Title: The Association of Peripheral Blood Monocytes to Cardiometabolic Complications in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy
Authors: Mitchell, Brooks
Issue Date: Aug 2015
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [August 2015]
Abstract: Monocytes are potent secretors of inflammatory cytokines and may contribute to chronic HIV-associated inflammation. We investigated the relationship between monocyte inflammatory properties and insulin resistance (IR) among HIV-infected participants in the setting of HIV viral suppression. Cross-sectional analysis of 33 HIVinfected participants age ≥40 years and on stable ART ≥3 months were compared to 14 HIV-uninfected participants of similar age, gender, and cardiovascular disease risk. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from fasting blood glucose and insulin measurements. Peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and percentages of monocyte intracellular IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, or TNF-α responses were determined by flow cytometry. We observed higher percentages of monocytes producing IL-1β and IL-8 after oxLDL stimulation were associated with higher IR as measured by HOMA-IR (all p<0.005) in HIV-infected participants on ART (median age 53 years, 87% males) but not in HIVuninfected participants. Longer duration since HIV diagnosis and longer duration since antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation were both associated with higher basal monocyte cytokine responses (all p<0.05). These data suggest elevated pro-inflammatory responses by monocytes, in particular IL-1β and IL-8, may contribute to the pathogenesis of IR during chronic HIV disease in the setting of viral suppression. Duration since HIV diagnosis or since ART initiation may contribute to basal monocyte cytokine responses. The role of monocyte cytokine responses in HIV disease progression and in cardio-metabolic complications warrants further study.
Description: M.S. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2015.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/51067
Appears in Collections:M.S. - Biomedical Sciences (Tropical Medicine)


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