Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/50884

Moderating the Effects of Parenting Stress on Marital Satisfaction in Parents of Children with Intellectual Disability

File Description SizeFormat 
2015-05-ma-cohen_r.pdfVersion for non-UH users. Copying/Printing is not permitted1.69 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
2015-05-ma-cohen_uh.pdfFor UH users only1.7 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Moderating the Effects of Parenting Stress on Marital Satisfaction in Parents of Children with Intellectual Disability
Authors: Cohen, Shereen
Keywords: Dyadic adjustment
parenting alliance
problem solving
Intellectual Disability
marriage
show 1 moreparenting
show less
Issue Date: May 2015
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2015]
Abstract: Parents of children with disabilities tend to experience greater marital distress than parents of typically developing children. However this result is small overall and couples vary greatly. The present study sought to determine whether certain resiliency factors might moderate the impact of parenting stress on marital adjustment in parents of children with intellectual disability. Two factors that were investigated were the parenting alliance and marital problem solving. It was hypothesized that one or both of these factors might interact with parenting stress to predict marital satisfaction, such that parents who score high on these factors might be less negatively impacted by parenting stress. Results indicated that the parenting alliance was a significant predictor of marital satisfaction, but did not interact with parenting stress. Marital problem solving interacted with parenting stress, but rather than buffering high stress, was an asset at low stress, and its benefits were nullified at high stress.
Description: M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2015.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/50884
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Psychology


Please contact sspace@hawaii.edu if you need this content in an alternative format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.