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The Role of Climatology in the Hawaiian Sugar-Cane Industry: An Example of Applied Agricultural Climatology in the Tropics

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Title: The Role of Climatology in the Hawaiian Sugar-Cane Industry: An Example of Applied Agricultural Climatology in the Tropics
Authors: Chang, Jen H.
Issue Date: Oct 1963
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press
Citation: Chang JH. 1963. The role of climatology in the Hawaiian sugar-cane industry: an example of applied agricultural climatology in the tropics. Pac Sci 17(4): 379-397.
Abstract: Climatological study in the Hawaiian sugarcane
industry has a long, noteworthy history.
Meteorological observations on the plantations
were initiated in 1883, preceding the establishment
of the first official weather bureau station
in Hawaii by fully 20 years. The climatological
network in the cane-growing areas expanded by
leaps and bounds to 50 stations at the turn of
the century, and to 500 stations in 1960 in an
area of only 350 sq miles (Fig. 1).
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/4942
ISSN: 0030-8870
Appears in Collections:Pacific Science Volume 17, Number 4, 1963



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