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The Influence of Symbiotic Dinoflagellates on Respiratory Processes in the Giant Clam Tridacna squamosa

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Title: The Influence of Symbiotic Dinoflagellates on Respiratory Processes in the Giant Clam Tridacna squamosa
Authors: Mangum, C.P.
Johansen, K.
Issue Date: Jul 1982
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press
Citation: Mangum CP, Johansen K. 1982. The influence of symbiotic dinoflagellates on respiratory processes in the giant clam Tridacna squamosa. Pac Sci 36(3): 395-401.
Abstract: Several aspects of respiratory gas exchange are distinctive in the
giant clam Tridacna squamosa, which obtains nutrients from symbiotic dinoflagellates
found in the mantle. During the day, when more oxygen is produced than
consumed by the host and its symbionts, oxygen extraction is negative. Exhalant
water P02 is higher than inhalant water P02, and prebranchial blood P02 is higher
than heart blood P02. Ventilation of the mantle cavity and the gills continues,
which rids the system of much excess oxygen and, possibly, prevents the formation
of gas bubbles in the blood, which is supersaturated. In the dark, when
the oxygen balance shifts to a rate of uptake that is unexceptional among
lamellibranchs, the ventilation rate remains low and oxygen extraction high
relative to species that rely exclusively on an exogenous food source. On a 24-hr
basis, the total oxygen uptake exceeded the total oxygen production.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/472
ISSN: 0030-8870
Appears in Collections:Pacific Science Volume 36, Number 3, 1982



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