Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/46028

Lessons from contemporary resettlement in the South Pacific

Item Summary

Title: Lessons from contemporary resettlement in the South Pacific
Authors: Burkett, Maxine
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Journal of International Affairs
Citation: Burkett, M. (2015) Lessons from contemporary resettlement in the South Pacific, Journal of international Affairs, 68.
Abstract: Depending on the scale and distance of migration, a variety of challenges face both those moving because of climate impacts and the communities receiving these migrants. Thelessons drawn from resettlements and planned 2020relocations thus far most notably in the Carteret Islands of Papua New Guinea— underscore the importance of adequate funding, careful planning, restoring traditional livelihoods, and ensuring voluntary community participation throughout the entire process. Critical hurdles persist, however, particularly for the most vulnerable communities within nation-states. This article explores the importance of adequate funding and identifies the dangerous and nagging impediments present, even as climate-induced migration advances in the adaptation 2020discourse. With a focus on the Carteret Islanders’ ongoing relocation and resettlement to the island of Bougainville, this article argues that communities may face economic development and political gaps. Economic development gaps inhibit communities’ abilities to address redevelopment needs that elude appropriate classification for funding because they are neither strictly “climate” nor “development” categories. Additionally, political gaps exacerbate the challenges of accessing existing funding for local communities that are at odds with the national governments that purportedly represent their interests. These gaps compound the general lack of adequate funding for climate change mitigation and adaptation. Considering models for a new framework, this article explores the applicability of existing community-oriented funding regimes to address the political and economic development challenges that climate migrants face.
Pages/Duration: 18 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/46028
Appears in Collections:Burkett, Maxine



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