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Transit-Oriented Development in Hawai'i: Economic Viability of TOD in Iwilei

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Title: Transit-Oriented Development in Hawai'i: Economic Viability of TOD in Iwilei
Authors: Schatz, Linda
Advisor: Akiona, Randy
Issue Date: Dec 2009
Abstract: Mass transit will not only relieve congestion and provide access to the traditionally underserved on the Leeward Coast; it will influence growth and transform our urban landscape. Uncertainty surrounds the project because transit-oriented development (TOD) is a new concept to Hawai i and the City & County of Honolulu is learning how to plan for and influence potential development along the alignment. This project can have vast implications and therefore government‟s role in planning and managing growth must be proactive. Community workshops have been held in Waipahu, Pearl Ridge, Kapolei, and Leeward Community College to gather input for planning purposes. Developments are being planned in larger suburban areas and in the primary urban core where large land owners are located. These hold the greatest promise because single private entities will be able to coordinate land-use and planning to ensure TOD‟s promise. Areas such as Iwilei, Chinatown, and Kalihi are more difficult because ownership of land is spread among many individual entities. Planning for TOD in these areas is more challenging and will likely require government assistance. Not much has been done in such areas to improve their decaying urban situation and yet they have the highest populations of low-income resident who ride public transportation. These are the areas in most need of revitalization and the people who live in these locations could benefit the most from transit and TOD. Given this need, my research will focus on Iwilei station, an inner city TOD, with fragmented land ownership. This location has fragmented land ownership, but it also has 8 the neighboring public housing projects within a quarter mile walk from the station, which can provide immediate ridership. The surrounding light industrial areas and vacant or underutilized parcels are ideal for redevelopment. Mass transit will not only relieve congestion and provide access to the traditionally underserved on the Leeward Coast; it will influence growth and transform our urban landscape. Uncertainty surrounds the project because transit-oriented development (TOD) is a new concept to Hawai i and the City & County of Honolulu is learning how to plan for and influence potential development along the alignment. This project can have vast implications and therefore government‟s role in planning and managing growth must be proactive. Community workshops have been held in Waipahu, Pearl Ridge, Kapolei, and Leeward Community College to gather input for planning purposes. Developments are being planned in larger suburban areas and in the primary urban core where large land owners are located. These hold the greatest promise because single private entities will be able to coordinate land-use and planning to ensure TOD‟s promise. Areas such as Iwilei, Chinatown, and Kalihi are more difficult because ownership of land is spread among many individual entities. Planning for TOD in these areas is more challenging and will likely require government assistance. Not much has been done in such areas to improve their decaying urban situation and yet they have the highest populations of low-income resident who ride public transportation. These are the areas in most need of revitalization and the people who live in these locations could benefit the most from transit and TOD. Given this need, my research will focus on Iwilei station, an inner city TOD, with fragmented land ownership. This location has fragmented land ownership, but it also has 8 the neighboring public housing projects within a quarter mile walk from the station, which can provide immediate ridership. The surrounding light industrial areas and vacant or underutilized parcels are ideal for redevelopment. Mass transit will not only relieve congestion and provide access to the traditionally underserved on the Leeward Coast; it will influence growth and transform our urban landscape. Uncertainty surrounds the project because transit-oriented development (TOD) is a new concept to Hawai i and the City & County of Honolulu is learning how to plan for and influence potential development along the alignment. This project can have vast implications and therefore government‟s role in planning and managing growth must be proactive. Community workshops have been held in Waipahu, Pearl Ridge, Kapolei, and Leeward Community College to gather input for planning purposes. Developments are being planned in larger suburban areas and in the primary urban core where large land owners are located. These hold the greatest promise because single private entities will be able to coordinate land-use and planning to ensure TOD‟s promise. Areas such as Iwilei, Chinatown, and Kalihi are more difficult because ownership of land is spread among many individual entities. Planning for TOD in these areas is more challenging and will likely require government assistance. Not much has been done in such areas to improve their decaying urban situation and yet they have the highest populations of low-income resident who ride public transportation. These are the areas in most need of revitalization and the people who live in these locations could benefit the most from transit and TOD. Given this need, my research will focus on Iwilei station, an inner city TOD, with fragmented land ownership. This location has fragmented land ownership, but it also has 8 the neighboring public housing projects within a quarter mile walk from the station, which can provide immediate ridership. The surrounding light industrial areas and vacant or underutilized parcels are ideal for redevelopment. Mass transit will not only relieve congestion and provide access to the traditionally underserved on the Leeward Coast; it will influence growth and transform our urban landscape. Uncertainty surrounds the project because transit-oriented development (TOD) is a new concept to Hawai i and the City & County of Honolulu is learning how to plan for and influence potential development along the alignment. This project can have vast implications and therefore government‟s role in planning and managing growth must be proactive. Community workshops have been held in Waipahu, Pearl Ridge, Kapolei, and Leeward Community College to gather input for planning purposes. Developments are being planned in larger suburban areas and in the primary urban core where large land owners are located. These hold the greatest promise because single private entities will be able to coordinate land-use and planning to ensure TOD‟s promise. Areas such as Iwilei, Chinatown, and Kalihi are more difficult because ownership of land is spread among many individual entities. Planning for TOD in these areas is more challenging and will likely require government assistance. Not much has been done in such areas to improve their decaying urban situation and yet they have the highest populations of low-income resident who ride public transportation. These are the areas in most need of revitalization and the people who live in these locations could benefit the most from transit and TOD. Given this need, my research will focus on Iwilei station, an inner city TOD, with fragmented land ownership. This location has fragmented land ownership, but it also has 8 the neighboring public housing projects within a quarter mile walk from the station, which can provide immediate ridership. The surrounding light industrial areas and vacant or underutilized parcels are ideal for redevelopment.
Pages/Duration: 151 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45775
Appears in Collections:2009



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