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Building Tomorrow's Primary Schools Today: Using Future Studies to Anticipate How Increased Techonology Use in Education Might Effect Current Primary School Design

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Title: Building Tomorrow's Primary Schools Today: Using Future Studies to Anticipate How Increased Techonology Use in Education Might Effect Current Primary School Design
Authors: Siwy, Eric
Advisor: Meder, Stephen
Issue Date: Dec 2011
Abstract: Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.Technology is ubiquitous in today’s society and has been slowly working its way in to classrooms and educational facilities for over half a century. Over the last 10-15 years the rate at which the internet, computers, and other tools have been used for educational purposes in the classroom has increased (though still not at the rate many suspected it would). Unfortunately, the majority of existing primary schools and even “schools of the future” that do attempt to incorporate solutions for technological use generally optimize the building for today’s already widespread technology. The average primary school is expected to last for forty years. A school built today still needs to be effective and functional as it approaches the world of 2050. Given the current rate of technological change this is too short-sighted.
While education theorists have given quite a bit of thought as to how technology might improve a child’s ability to learn, there seems to be a lack of literature on how future technology may affect the requirements of a school building or even allow the building itself to aid in instruction. Much of the research dealing with technology in education also seems to be coming from educators and less so from futurists. This is important as educators seem less confident in making predictions about technology and its effect the farther they look in to the future.
This project is two-fold: 1) use a Futures Studies lens to lay out the path of governance, economics, environment, culture, and technology over the next forty years time to forecast a future scenario that makes clear how technology is likely to influence education, and 2) show how those pedagogical changes substantially alter the architectural design requirements from the current norm over the course of a school building’s lifespan.
In order to maximize a school building’s effectiveness over time, architects should be well-versed in current and projected trends in education and technology; this will also minimize costly retrofits or additions. The goal of this project is not visioning or backcasting in order to bring about a preferred future by changing the present, but merely to consider what steps designers should be taking in current primary school design to account for these anticipated trends. Based on a historical analysis, a brief review of current design guidelines, and case studies, this project shows that current primary school architecture fails to take in to account the concurrent plausible scenarios of rapid advances in technology, its continued introduction in to the classroom, and how to best plan for that assuming a resource-constrained future society using a new set of revised design trends.
Pages/Duration: 109 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45707
Appears in Collections:2011



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