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Hawaiian Architecture: Developing Responsible Stewards of Our Land

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Title: Hawaiian Architecture: Developing Responsible Stewards of Our Land
Authors: Palama, Francine
Advisor: Leineweber, Spencer
Issue Date: May 2012
Abstract: Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.Ka poʻe kahiko, the ancient Hawaiians recognized the relationship between the natural world and their existence as an integral part of their survival. They perpetuated and exemplified sustainable, ecological, and economical principles of conservation and encouraged those principles into their daily lives. These values also accessed a deep reflection for the type of structures that were built on the land and in the ocean. These traditional Hawaiian buildings are formed from natural laws and conditioned by material properties symbolizing the creative powers of the earth and sky. The intentions of the ka poʻe kahiko was to live with nature by honoring their gods, respecting the land, and developing harmonious relationships amongst themselves.
In this thesis, traditional Hawaiian architecture practices, learning methods, and cultural norms are explored and successful elements identified. These elements and research of the literature are incorporated into a foundation for a Native Hawaiian undergraduate architecture concentration. However, the challenge for current architecture education research is to understand how cultural practices influence students, and in turn, how the understanding of modern design approaches can be used to improve, extend, and promote cultural transformation for the current architecture program. Implementing a relevant process of student reflections, survey, kūpuna interviews and analysis of community-based projects is included to illustrate how Hawaiian architecture education strategies can be effectively integrated into the current program.
Pages/Duration: 138 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45692
Appears in Collections:2012



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