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Museums: A Beacon for Change For Heritage Buildings

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Title: Museums: A Beacon for Change For Heritage Buildings
Authors: Wallis, Dianna
Advisor: Leineweber, Spencer
Issue Date: Dec 2012
Abstract: The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.The integrations of additions to heritage buildings is a highly contentious and ongoing debate that transcends the field of architecture and preservation globally. Generally, experts in the field agree that an integration will change the built environment. The contention lays in how it should change. Historical architects such as Steven W. Semes have made the argument that the changes while necessary should be gradual. While others like Daniel Libeskind have advocated for additions that embody new culturally relevant ideas. This dissertation contributes to the conversation by underscoring the point that the debate should not be about defined lines on what is/is not appropriate, but rather that additions need to be a product of the community’s values and that every addition should engender something new that links it to a time and place. While this dissertation acknowledges the open-ended nature of this debate, it proposes a possible approach to the integration of additions to heritage buildings. This dissertation argues that the approach to adding to a heritage building should be structured around the needs of the community, the respectful integration with the existing building, and the inventive projection of a culturally and aesthetically sustainable addition.
Qualitative analysis has been selected as the research methodology. Various approaches to integrating substantial additions to heritage buildings have been analyzed using nine detailed case studies on museums that occupy heritage buildings, found throughout the world. The case studies explore the consequences of those decisions on their immediate community; additionally, each case study highlights the building’s architectural evolution. The case studies reveal the underlying issue that adding to an existing building is highly subjective, for there are numerous variables that contribute to every design decision. Additionally, the case studies illustrate that while there are benefits to the sustainable integration of additions to heritage buildings, there are also many challenges.
The objective of the dissertation is to add to the conversation of the future of heritage buildings, by highlighting the fact that the future of the built environment cannot rest in a static set of guidelines. There needs to be a dialogue with the community and the developer on how to develop an innovative but sustainable approach to integrating an addition to a heritage building.
Pages/Duration: 281 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45671
Appears in Collections:2012



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