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Geothermal Heat Pumps: Energy Efficient Heating Solution for the East Coast Row House

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Title: Geothermal Heat Pumps: Energy Efficient Heating Solution for the East Coast Row House
Authors: Lopez, Carlos
Advisor: Rockwood, David
Issue Date: May 2013
Abstract: This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.This research document examines the home heating and cooling costs of historic row houses on the eastern coast of the United States and the best option for preservation and adding value added to these homes. The goal of the research is to identify the most energy efficient solution for East Coast Row House (ECRH) homeowners who are unable to afford the high cost of oil and gas space heating and cooling systems that are typically found in historic homes in need of preservation renovations. Professional literature, field knowledge from empirical case studies, and government produced data highlight the necessity for a utility retrofit to reduce energy wastefulness, and the high financial burden on homeowners.
The historical context of ECRHs and the methodology for undergoing a retrofit lay the foundation for this research investigation. Comparative analysis on home heating systems, with focus on costs, efficiency, and returns, provides justifiable reasoning for the goal solution. This research concludes that the best feasible option for ECRH homeowners is to incorporate a Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) system and improve the thermal envelope via insulation. The evidence in this research supports the proposal that a GHP retrofit can drastically reduce utility costs by 40 percent, increase market value, preserve historic qualities and longevity of the house, and provide investment return within ten years of installation.
ECRHs currently account for 34 percent of homes on the East Coast with the average home heating bill as much as $2,298 a year. Data shows that currently less than one percent of homes in the United States use GHP while it is confirmed that it reduces home heating costs between 40 and 70 percent. Lack of GHP knowledge and awareness of associated government benefits is an identifiable reason for low residential usage of GHP in the United States. This research targets the large population of homeowners who are unaware of efficient and viable options such as GHP, and are in need of this knowledge the most in order to better their lives.
Pages/Duration: 141 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45662
Appears in Collections:2013



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