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Research Models, Community Engagement, and Linguistic Fieldwork: Reflections on Working within Canadian Indigenous Communities

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dc.contributor.authorCzaykowska-Higgins, Ewaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-30T01:46:11Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-30T01:46:11Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationCzaykowska-Higgins, Ewa. 2009. Research Models, Community Engagement, and Linguistic Fieldwork: Reflections on Working within Canadian Indigenous Communities. Language Documentation & Conservation 3(1):15-50en_US
dc.identifier.issn1934-5275en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10125/4423-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reflects on different research models in linguistic fieldwork and on different levels of engagement in and with language-speaking communities, focusing on the Canadian context. I begin by examining a linguist-focused model of research: this is language research conducted by linguists, for linguists; the language-speaking community’s participation is limited mostly to being the source of fluent speakers, and the level of engagement in the community by a linguist is relatively small. I then consider models that involve more engaged and collaborative research, and define the Community-Based Language Research model which allows for the production of knowledge on a language that is constructed for, with, and by community members, and that is therefore not primarily for or by linguists. In CBLR, linguists are actively engaged partners working collaboratively with language communities. Collaborative models of research seem to be closest in spirit to models advocated by Indigenous groups in Canada and elsewhere. I reflect here on (1) why one might choose to work within a collaborative research model, and (2) what some of the challenges are that linguists face when they conduct research collaboratively. In a broad sense the purpose of this paper is to think through some questions that an “outsider” linguist might face when undertaking linguistic research in an Indigenous community today.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Foreign Language Resource Centeren_US
dc.format.extent37 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Hawai'i Pressen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivativesen_US
dc.subjectcollaborationen_US
dc.subjectfieldworken_US
dc.subjectcommunity-baseden_US
dc.subjectresearch modelen_US
dc.titleResearch Models, Community Engagement, and Linguistic Fieldwork: Reflections on Working within Canadian Indigenous Communitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.dcmiTexten_US
prism.publicationnameLanguage Documentation & Conservationen_US
prism.volume3en_US
prism.number1en_US
Appears in Collections:Volume 03 Issue 1 : Language Documentation & Conservation



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