Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/43715

Berths and Anchorages: Pacific Cultural Studies from OceaniaBerths and Anchorages: Pacific Cultural Studies from Oceania

File SizeFormat 
v28n1-130-151.pdf328.8 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Berths and Anchorages: Pacific Cultural Studies from OceaniaBerths and Anchorages: Pacific Cultural Studies from Oceania
Authors: Kauvaka, Lea Lani Kinikini
Keywords: cultural studies
Native Pacific cultural studies
Pacific Islands studies
the University of the South Pacific
Oceania Centre for Arts, Culture, and Pacific Studies
show 2 moremetaphorical canoes
berthing spaces

show less
LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: University of Hawai‘i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Kauvaka, L. L. K. 2016. Berths and Anchorages: Pacific Cultural Studies from Oceania. The Contemporary Pacific 28 (1): 130-151.Kauvaka, L. L. K. 2016. Berths and Anchorages: Pacific Cultural Studies from Oceania. The Contemporary Pacific 28 (1): 130-151.
Abstract: The canoe has been a dominant metaphor constituting the discursive growth of Pacific studies in its transformation from a multidisciplinary to interdisciplinary project. In the first half of this essay I grapple with extending the canoe metaphors discussed by Vicente Diaz and J Kēkaulani Kauanui in their 2001 article “Native Pacific Cultural Studies on the Edge,” and in the latter part I discuss programming at the Oceania Centre for Arts and Culture and Pacific Studies at the University of the South Pacific. Not wholly rejecting the “seductive metaphor” of Pacific studies as an interdisciplinary canoe between fields of study, my intention rather is to seek how to expand the metaphor productively toward anchorages and berths to produce homegrown theorizing of our intellectual practices, including creative practices. Practice-based research paradigms are increasingly being utilized in Pacific studies, and this kind of re-engagement with the discourse is productive. For a more holistic and pragmatic as well as intellectual and political Pacific studies, the canoe must make landfall, to complete a hermeneutic circle that began with the theoretical placing of the canoe as the animus of the interdisciplinary project in 2001.
Pages/Duration: 23 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/43715
ISSN: 1043-898X
Appears in Collections:TCP [The Contemporary Pacific], 2016 - Volume 28, Number 1



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.