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Title: The impact of malaria on birds in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Authors: van Riper, Charles III
van Riper, Sandra G.
Goff, M Lee
Laird, Marshall
LC Subject Headings: Avian malaria -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Birds -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)
Issue Date: Nov-1982
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: van Riper C, van Riper SG, Goff ML, Laird M. 1982. The impact of malaria on birds in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 47.
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
47
Abstract: The Hawaiian Islands are the most isolated land mass in the world, lying in the middle of the Pacific Ocean over 4,500 km from North America and 5,000 km from Asia. Because of their sterile volcanic origin and great distances from the continents, colonization was infrequent, but when it did occur, the organisms, isolated from mainland influences and constraints, underwent rapid and extensive adaptive radiation. Among the
spectacular examples are the land birds, in which 10 of the 11 families have endemic species. Unfortunately, more of these endemic species have become extinct than in any other comparable region of the world. There have been many proposed hypotheses as to why so many native bird species succumbed in the short time period following discovery of the Islands by Captain Cook in 1778; these include habitat destruction by mainland introduced ungulates, indiscriminate collecting of birds, competition with introduced birds, introduced predators, and introduced diseases. In this paper we will attempt to ascertain the role that the introduced malaria parasite has played in the decline of Hawaiian avifauna.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: National Park Service Agreement No. CX 8000 7 009
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/4006
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



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