Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/38765

Working Out What to Wear in Papua New Guinea: The Politics of Fashion in Stella

File SizeFormat 
v27n1-39-70.pdf1.22 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Working Out What to Wear in Papua New Guinea: The Politics of Fashion in Stella
Authors: Spark, Ceridwen
Keywords: Papua New Guinea, gender, fashion, feminism, culture, media
LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: University of Hawai‘i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Spark, C. 2015. Working Out What to Wear in Papua New Guinea: The Politics of Fashion in Stella. The Contemporary Pacific 27 (1): 39-70.
Abstract: In this article I discuss Stella, a new women’s magazine in Papua New Guinea. Noting that Stella provides a context for celebrating new Pacific femininities, I argue that the magazine’s representations of fashion are a crucial way in which this refiguring of the feminine occurs. Discussing the significance of what women wear through reference to anthropological insights about the relationship between clothing, gender, and status, I suggest that in PNG, clothing is a focal point of cultural debate. Through its playful politics, Stella intervenes in this debate, thus smuggling a deeply political message between its glossy pages. In addition, I demonstrate that through its selective aestheticization of the “local” and the “traditional,” the magazine acknowledges educated, young Papua New Guinean women’s desire to reconfigure “culture” in more inclusive ways.In this article I discuss Stella, a new women’s magazine in Papua New Guinea. Noting that Stella provides a context for celebrating new Pacific femininities, I argue that the magazine’s representations of fashion are a crucial way in which this refiguring of the feminine occurs. Discussing the significance of what women wear through reference to anthropological insights about the relationship between clothing, gender, and status, I suggest that in PNG, clothing is a focal point of cultural debate. Through its playful politics, Stella intervenes in this debate, thus smuggling a deeply political message between its glossy pages. In addition, I demonstrate that through its selective aestheticization of the “local” and the “traditional,” the magazine acknowledges educated, young Papua New Guinean women’s desire to reconfigure “culture” in more inclusive ways.
Pages/Duration: 32 p.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/38765
ISSN: 1043-898X
Appears in Collections:TCP [The Contemporary Pacific], 2015 - Volume 27, Number 1



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.