Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/38206

Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 9 of 11

Video Preview

HWST 478 JO Contact and Colonialization Discussions.mp4

Not all videos support streaming previews. You will not be able to jump to portions of the video that have not been downloaded (progress shown as a yellow bar).

In cases where streaming is not supported, the full video will be loaded before playing. If your computer is capable of playing the video files, it may be advisable to download using the link below instead of trying to view it in your browser.

 

Item Summary

Title: Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 9 of 11
Authors: Place-based WAC/WID Hui
Keywords: place-based writing
writing across the curriculum
writing in the disciplines
Writing Intensive courses
scholarship of teaching and learning
show 63 morewriting pedagogy
general education requirements
sense of place
identity
kind of learning
government
possession
social footing
makaainana
class
laborers
position
dispossession
overthrow
watershed
control
education
language
language speakers
related
connection
access
power
connected
pattern
established
students
pre-overthrow
attitudes
anger
resentment
missionaries
commercialization
influx of people
intermarriage
kanaka
haole
asian
music
people disappearing
awareness
wistfulness
composing
dancing
participate
historic
dance
impending doom
hawaiian
kingdom
government
ancestors
clarity
unclear
royals
liliuokalani
likelike
family
determination
hope
knowledge
native hawaiian population
kanaka maoli

show less
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Osorio, John. 'Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 9 of 11.' Interview with Jim Henry and Dawne Bost. Scholarspace. Sep. 2015. Web.
Abstract: Brief excerpt from interview: A kind of dispossession was taking place well before the loss of the government…This dispossession isn't land, there is a dispossession in terms of social footing... Some people think that the overthrow is a major kind of watershed. I don't. I think you do lose control over our own education and that leads to loss of language and language speakers. That is probably the biggest effect. In terms of how the people were related and had access to power, I tend to think of the overthrow... as one more thing in a pattern that was established already.
Description: This item includes a segment of an an instructor interview in a Writing Intensive course in Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. The interview was conducted in 2014 and in this clip the interviewee is discussing European contact and the future of Hawaiʻi and its people as reflected in their music.
Pages/Duration: Duration: 00:05:43
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/38206
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Appears in Collections:Instructor: Jonathan Kamakawiwoʻole Osorio



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.