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History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: 'Elepaio, 'Ō'ō, & Kioea

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Title: History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: 'Elepaio, 'Ō'ō, & Kioea
Authors: Banko, Winston E.
Keywords: Chasiempis sandwichensis
Moho braccatus
Oo
Ooaa
Kioea
LC Subject Headings: Elepaio.
Bird populations -- Hawaii.
Endemic birds -- Hawaii -- History.
Forest birds -- Hawaii.
Muscicapidae.
show 1 moreHoneyeaters.
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Issue Date: Dec 1981
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Banko WE. 1981. History of endemic Hawaiian birds: part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: 'Elepaio, 'Ō'ō, & Kioea. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. CPSU/UH Avian History Report, 7a and 7b.
Series/Report no.: Avian History Report
7a & 7b
Abstract: Chasiempis sandwichensis is a small, grayish Old World flycatcher (Muscicapidae). Chasiempis sandwichensis sclateri is endemic to the island of Kaua'i. Chasiempis sandwichensis gayi is endemic to the island of O’ahu. Chasiempis sandwichensis sandwichensis is endemic to the island of Hawai’i.

Moho braccatus, or ‘O’o’a’a, is a medium-sized, brownish-black, moderately long-tailed forest bird beloging to the family Meliphagidae and is endemic to Kaua’i. Moho apicalis, or O’ahu ‘O’o, is a large (12-inch long), black, plume-tailed forest bird endemic to O’ahu. Moho bishopi, or Moloka’i ‘O’o, is a large, black, plume-tailed forest bird endemic to Moloka’i. Reports on an unknown species of Moho presumably endemic to Maui are also reviewed. Moho nobilis, or Hawai’I ‘O’o, is endemic to Hawai’i.

Chaetopila angustipluma, or Kioea, also of the family Meliphagidae, became extinct shortly after 1859.

These reports detail the results of exhaustive search of literature and field journals detailing observational notes, collection records, reports, and related statements on relative abundance and geographical distribution. Records are serially numbered, arranged in geographical and chronological order, referenced, and systematically reviewed. Analyses of population trends are discussed.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; National Park Service Contract No. CX 8000 8 0012
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/346
Appears in Collections:The Avian History Reports



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