Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/34473

Developing First Nations Courts in Canada: Elders as Foundational to Indigenous Therapeutic Jurisprudence +

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Title: Developing First Nations Courts in Canada: Elders as Foundational to Indigenous Therapeutic Jurisprudence +
Authors: Johnson, S.
Issue Date: Dec 2014
Citation: Johnson, S. (2014). Developing First Nations Courts in Canada: Elders as Foundational to Indigenous Therapeutic Jurisprudence +. Journal of Indigenous Social Development, 3(2).
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it introduces the concept of Indigenous therapeutic jurisprudence + processes in Canada in which the “plus” represents the critical roles of Elders and spirituality in court proceedings. Second, it identifies and discusses diverse First Nations court models that exist in Canada, including those known as Healing courts, Gladue courts, Aboriginal and tribal courts and their work to address the over-representation of Aboriginal peoples sentenced to custody in Canada. Third, it considers that First Nations courts could benefit through the provision of equitable capital investment and operating funding supports that are currently provided to the alternative Downtown Community Courts and Drug Treatment Court models in Vancouver, British Columbia.
Pages/Duration: 14 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/34473
Appears in Collections:JISD Volume 03, Issue 02. Papers From the Second International Conference of Indigenous Voices in Social Work



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