Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/344

History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: Hawaiian raven/crow ('Alalā)

File Description SizeFormat 
06b.pdf3.92 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: Hawaiian raven/crow ('Alalā)
Authors: Banko, Winston E.
Keywords: Corvis tropicus
Alala
LC Subject Headings: Endemic birds -- Hawaii -- History.
Bird populations -- Hawaii.
Forest birds -- Hawaii.
Rare birds -- Hawaii.
Hawaiian crow.
show 3 moreCrows -- Hawaii.
Endangered species -- Hawaii.
Birds -- Nests.

show less
Issue Date: Jun 1980
Publisher: Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Banko WE, Banko PC. 1980. History of endemic Hawaiian birds: part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: Hawaiian raven/crow ('Alalā). Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. CPSU/UH Avian History Report, 6b.
Series/Report no.: Avian History Report
6b
Abstract: Corvis tropicus is a medium-sized, brownish-black, robust-billed raven/crow endemic to the island of Hawai'i. Very little is known of its distribution and relative abundance during the first 100 years after discovery of the species during the voyage of Captain James Cook in 1778. Observations and collection of specimens from 1887 to 1902 indicate that 'Alalā were common to abundant locally in Kona and Ka'ū districts, being found chiefly in forests from 1700 to more than 3000 feet elevation and conspicuously absent elsewhere. Today, however, the bird is considered rare and in danger of extirpation. Distributional records are shown by U. S. Geological Survey quadrangle. References and names of observers are cited. Completeness of data, bias, erroneous and doubtful records are addressed. Findings are summarized. There is an extensive discussion on nesting. Few and widely scattered breeding groups, apparent low survival of fledglings and immatures, and unprecedented wandering during the contemporary period all suggest continuing depopulation. Captive breeding for reintroduction into restored habitats is the most obvious remaining hope of preserving a self-sustaining wild population.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; National Park Service Contract No. CX 8000 8 0012
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/344
Appears in Collections:The Avian History Reports



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.