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Title: History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: Hawaiian thrushes
Authors: Banko, Winston E.
Keywords: Phaeornis obscurus
Phaeornis palmeri
Puaiohi
Hawaiian thrush
LC Subject Headings: Endemic birds -- Hawaii -- History.
Bird populations -- Hawaii.
Forest birds -- Hawaii.
Thrushes.
Rare birds -- Hawaii.
show 1 moreEndangered species -- Hawaii.
show less
Issue Date: Jun-1980
Publisher: Cooperataive National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Banko WE. 1980. History of endemic Hawaiian birds: part I: population histories, species accounts: forest birds: Hawaiian thrushes. Honolulu (HI): Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. CPSU/UH Avian History Report, 6c & 6d.
Series/Report no.: Avian History Report
6c & 6d
Abstract: Phaeornis obscurus is a medium-sized (7-8 inch long brownish thrush with light to dark gray underparts. It was first described in 1789. Exhaustive search uncovered some 517 observations, collection records, reports and related statements on relative abundance and geographical distribution from ca. 1778 to 1978. All data are arranged in order and systematically analyzed. Distributional records are shown by U. S. Geological Survey quadrangle. References and names of observers are cited. Completeness of data, bias, erroneous and doubtful records are addressed. Findings are summarized. It is concluded that all five subspecies have suffered catastrophic depopulations with only one subspecies (P. o. obscurus on the island of Hawai'i) given much chance of long-term survival.


Phaeornis palmeri is a medium-sized (6-7 inch long) olive to ashy-brown thrush with whitish abdomen endemic to Kaua'i. It was first described in 1893. Exhaustive search uncovered some 36 observations, collection records, reports and related statements on relative abundance and geographical distribution from 1891 to 1978. All data are arranged in order and systematically analyzed. Distributional records are shown by U. S. Geological Survey quadrangle. References and names of observers are cited. Completeness of data, bias, erroneous and doubtful records are addressed. Findings are summarized. Until such time as results of U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service surveys are published it is concluded that the Puaiohi is on the verge of final disappearance if not actually extinct.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; National Park Service Contract No. CX 8000 8 0012
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/343
Appears in Collections:The Avian History Reports



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