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Of Time and the River: "Ceded Lands" and the Ongoing Quest for Justice in Hawai'i

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Title: Of Time and the River: "Ceded Lands" and the Ongoing Quest for Justice in Hawai'i
Authors: Chang, Williamson B.C.
Keywords: Hawaii
Native Hawaiian
Federal Recognition
show 1 moreDe-occupation
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Issue Date: 02 Sep 2014
Abstract: Aloha. A lot has happened since the last forum sponsored by the American Constitutional Law Society on April 17 last spring. The last forum provided the springboard for the letter to Secretary of State John Kerry by OHA’s Chief Executive Officer, Kamana’pono Crabbe. Almost immediately the Department of Interior notified Hawaii that it would conduct fifteen hearings throughout the islands for the purpose of exploring rules to facilitate a government to government relationship between Native Hawaiian and the United States.
Those fifteen hearings became the talk of the summer. To many of us, the objective of the DOI proposal was to administratively recognize Native Hawaiians as a Federally Recognized Tribe. The statewide hearings were vibrant and emotional. At the hearings there was overwhelming opposition to the DOI proposals. As Dr. Keanu Sai put it, “the sleeping giant has awakened.” Those supporting “Federal Recognition” chose to put their position in writing by filing their testimony with the Department of Interior. Two camps emerged, “Federal Recognition” and “De-occupation.
Now is a moment for unity. United we prevail. Divided? History shows we lose. The issue surrounding the “ceded lands” is one where we can build consensus. Our responsibility to the aina is our kuleana.
Description: Presented to the William S. Richardson School of Law.
Pages/Duration: 21 pages
Appears in Collections:Chang, Williamson B.C.
Chang, Williamson B.C.

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