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Resurveying Of The Marine Environment Of KauaʻI: Views From The Perspective Of Locals And KūPuna

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Title: Resurveying Of The Marine Environment Of KauaʻI: Views From The Perspective Of Locals And KūPuna
Authors: Koethe, Francesca
Advisor: Maragos, James
Keywords: Kauaʻi
coral
reefs
fish
monk seals
show 3 morefishing
coastal sewage pollution
interviews

show less
Issue Date: 26 Sep 2014
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: In 1983, an initial coastal inventory was produced on Kauaʻi that included an atlas and a narrative inventory report sponsored by the Army Corps of Engineers. This inventory included field surveys at 77 marine and coastal sites around Kauaʻi in 1981 and information on the recreational and historical practices on the coastline perimeter of the island. In addition to recreational uses, status and location of coral and other marine organisms were recorded. Since this date, there has been no island-wide survey of the status of the coastal ecosystems of Kaua‘i. The study is a qualitative investigation of the current status and health of these resources based on interviews with local participants. Eventually, field re-surveys of the island will be accomplished. In addition, the narrative provides cultural features of the areas. It was hypothesized that anthropogenic activities have caused changes in the marine environment based on the perspective of local people, scientists, and na kānaka maoli (Native Hawaiians). Interviews and observational information from locals were collected and analyzed to understand problematic areas. The new interviews and the old narrative were used to collaboratively create newly updated information that would be available to the public. Areas of high priority and changes were highlighted, based on the issues that were revealed during the interviews. Eventually, field teams will use the new narrative for the next phase of the project, which is to conduct surveys at the originally surveyed 77 sites. Furthermore, additional sites will likely be surveyed based on important feedback from the Kauaʻi elders, locals, and scientists. The interviews are an independent but important component of the coastal inventory, and will supplement the marine and coastal surveys in order to gain a better understanding and verify the current status of Kauaʻi coral reefs, beaches and water quality.
Pages/Duration: 85 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/33950
Rights: All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Honors Projects for Zoology



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