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Landscape Discourse and Images of Nature in Japanese Visual Culture of the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

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Item Summary

Title: Landscape Discourse and Images of Nature in Japanese Visual Culture of the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
Authors: Kane, Andrew
Advisor: Szostak, John
Issue Date: May 2013
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2013]
Related To: http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/20024
Abstract: I explore the introduction and reception of the European concept of "landscape" to Japan and its subsequent impact upon the development of creative approaches to the representation of natural scenery in the visual media of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This period of Japanese history, roughly coinciding with the reign of the Meiji Emperor (1868-1912) and the decades immediately thereafter, witnessed the rapid acceleration of the dual processes of urbanization and industrialization, as well as profound cultural, political, and economic changes that would reverberate throughout the twentieth century. In the realm of the visual arts, an increasing level of interaction between various European and indigenous expressive modes would foster the development of hybrid forms of art that reflect changing Japanese attitudes toward nature, as well as a growing awareness of national identity within the public imagination. The art forms emerging out of this process simultaneously express significant stylistic and thematic continuities and divergences with previous Japanese creative responses to natural scenery.
Description: i, 93 leaves (20 figs.)
M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2013.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/33080
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Art History



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