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Cross-Linguistic Tendencies and Durational Contrasts in Geminate Consonants: An Examination of Guinaang Bontok Geminates

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Title: Cross-Linguistic Tendencies and Durational Contrasts in Geminate Consonants: An Examination of Guinaang Bontok Geminates
Authors: Reid, Lawrence A.
Aoyama, Katsura
Keywords: Bontok language
LC Subject Headings: Phonetics
Bontoc language -- Gemination
Issue Date: 2006
Citation: Reid, Lawrence and Katsura Aoyama. "Cross-Linguistic Tendencies and Durational Contrasts in Geminate Consonants: An Examination of Guinaang Bontok Geminates." Journal of the International Phonetic Association 36, no 2 (2006): 145-157.
Series/Report no.: Journal of the International Phonetic Association
vol. 36
no 2
Abstract: In Guinaang Bontok, there is a phonological contrast between singletons and geminates in all consonants (/p t k / b d g m n l s w j/) (Reid 1963, 1973; Thurgood 1997). All phonological geminates except for the oral voiced stop geminates are phonetically long consonants (Reid 1963), allowing a phonological distinction which is primarily based on phonetic duration for nasals, fricatives, liquids, glides and voiceless stops. In a cross-linguistic examination of geminates (Thurgood 1993), there were more languages listed as examples for having stop and nasal geminates than for glide geminates, and it was suggested that alveolar was the cross-linguistically preferred place of articulation for geminate consonants. In this study, it was hypothesized that the cross-linguistically less common length contrasts, such as the length contrasts in glides, were phonetically less clear than the more common ones, such as contrasts between short and long stop and nasal consonants. Similarly, it was hypothesized that contrasts in the cross-linguistically common place of articulation (i.e. alveolar) is phonetically clearer than less common contrasts (e.g. velar). In order to test these hypotheses, duration measurements were conducted on single and geminate consonants in Guinaang Bontok. The average durational contrast between short and long glides was smaller than the contrast in stop and nasal consonants. The hypothesis was therefore partially supported.
Pages/Duration: 13 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/33034
Appears in Collections:Lawrence A. Reid: Articles, Monographs, Book Chapters



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