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The Demise of Proto-Philippines

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Title: The Demise of Proto-Philippines
Authors: Reid, Lawrence A.
LC Subject Headings: Austronesian languages
Philippine languages
Issue Date: 1982
Citation: Reid, Lawrence. "The Demise of Proto-Philippines." In Papers from the Third International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics, Vol. 2: Tracking the Travellers, edited by Amran Halim, Lois Carrington, and Stephen Wurm, 145-170. Pacific Linguistic Series C, No. 75. Canberra: Australian National University, 1982.
Series/Report no.: Pacific Linguistic Series C
No. 75
Abstract: This paper constitutes a report of research in progress. Its results are tentative, in that I am still looking for confirmatory evidence, but the general direction of the research seems justified given the evidence presently available. For a number of years I have operated on the assumption that the Philippine languages (and possibly others, external to the Philippine archipelago) constitute a subfamily within the Malayo-Polynesian, or extra-Formosan languages. Certainly the languages are typologically similar, to the extent that the use of the term 'Philippine-type' is widely accepted as defining a certain kind of verbal syntax. It has been a useful assumption too, in that it has enabled us to reconstruct some features of an early proto-language, to which the label Proto-Philippines has been applied. Clinging to the concept of the Philippines as a subfamily, with each of its languages more closely related to one another than to any language outside the Philippines, has, for me anyway, been a reaction to the completely untenable theory that the different ethnic groups in the Philippines are the result of a series of migrations from the south and the west, a view that was popularised by the late H. Otley Beyer (1948) and which is still taught as fact in Philippine schools today. It is a theory , however, which has never been substantiated by any evidence, linguistic or archaeological.
Pages/Duration: 16 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/33015
Appears in Collections:Lawrence A. Reid: Articles, Monographs, Book Chapters



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