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A Cross-Generational View of Contact-Related Phenomena in a Philippine Language: Phonology

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Title: A Cross-Generational View of Contact-Related Phenomena in a Philippine Language: Phonology
Authors: Reid, Lawrence A.
Keywords: Bontok language
Phonemic change
LC Subject Headings: Bontoc language
Philippine languages
Language and languages--Usage
Issue Date: 2005
Citation: Reid, Lawrence. "A Cross-Generational View of Contact-Related Phenomena in a Philippine Language: Phonology." In Sociolinguistics and Language Education in the Philippines and Beyond: Festschrift in Honor of Ma. Lourdes S. Bautista, edited by S. Quakenbush and D. Dayag. Manila: Linguistic Society of the Philippines and the Summer Institute of Linguistics, 2005.
Abstract: The Philippines is a treasure house for the study of the effects of language contact. The extensive borrowing that occurred from Chinese and Malay-speaking traders (Wolff 1973-1974), prior to the coming of the Spanish in 1521, and from other foreign languages such as Spanish and English since then are well-known and often described (Wolff 1976). However, the influence of local Philippine languages on one another is another rich source of data on language contact, and one which has not often been as carefully explored. Probably all Philippine languages have large sets of lexical items which have been borrowed from one or another of the widely-spoken languages such as Filipino (Tagalog), Ilokano, Cebuano, Hiligaynon or Magindanao. The recognition of such borrowings though is sometimes obscured because of the similarity between the phonologies of the source languages and the donor languages. The primary purpose of this paper is to characterize and account for some of the massive changes that have taken place in the phonological system of one of the dialects of Central Bontok, that spoken in barangay Guinaang, over the last fifty years, primarily as a result of literacy in English, and the massive influx of Ilokano (and Tagalog) loanwords in the language.
Pages/Duration: 12 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/33010
Appears in Collections:Lawrence A. Reid: Articles, Monographs, Book Chapters



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